Teachers urged to venture into business PDF Print E-mail

TEACHERS should develop entrepreneurship skills and start their own businesses in order to improve their economic status, Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU) acting Pro-Vice Chancellor Professor Takawira Gwarimba said.

 

Created: 17 April 2012

 

Adopted from The Chronicle

Addressing delegates during the just ended 31st Zimbabwe Teachers Association (Zimta) Annual Conference in Bulawayo in Friday, Prof Gwarimba implored teachers to venture into business instead of relying on salaries.TEACHERS should develop entrepreneurship skills and start their own businesses in order to improve their economic status, Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU) acting Pro-Vice Chancellor Professor Takawira Gwarimba said.
Addressing delegates during the just ended 31st Zimbabwe Teachers Association (Zimta) Annual Conference in Bulawayo in Friday, Prof Gwarimba implored teachers to venture into business instead of relying on salaries.
“Zimta should create synergies with other organisations so that teachers can make some savings. There should be a revolving fund to provide loans to be used by teachers as capital for their businesses.
"Teachers can get the land and venture into some farming projects. For instance market gardening and cattle ranching. We should empower ourselves so that we have something to lean on when we retire," said Prof Gwarimba.
He said there were many business opportunities for teachers to venture into and urged them to be risk takers in order to exploit their business potential.
Delivering their solidarity messages during the conference, local and regional and international sister unions also embraced the economic empowerment of teachers.
They said the conditions of service for teachers the world over were threatened by inadequate financing and poor remuneration.
The deputy secretary-general of the Botswana Teachers Union, Mr Michael Mothibi, accused governments of employing delaying tactics when engaged on issues of salary increase.
He said the time had come for teacher unions to unite and demand their economic rights.
The executive secretary of Namibia National Teachers' Union, Mrs Teopolina Tangeni Engombe, said governments should engage in dialogue and address the plight of educators by paying better salries.
The president of Student Teachers Association of Zimbabwe, Mr Tendeukai Mukurunge, said educators should be empowered economically in order to restore their dignity in society and motivate them to render efficient service.
Zambian National Union of Teachers representative Mr Lazarus Chongo said his government had agreed to empower teachers adding that dialogue over the issue was at an advanced stage.
The president of the Public Service Association (PSA), a mother body of all civil servants unions, Mrs Cecelia Alexander, said teachers in the country should be empowered in order to restore their dignity.
She said teachers were now a laughing stock because they were poor and called on the Government to put in place a deliberate programme for their empowerment.
Mr Sifudza Wandile, who represented the Swaziland National Association of Teachers, said the salaries earned by teachers in the region were not commensurate with their workload and accused governments of exploiting the educators.
Lesotho Teachers Association, the Canadian Teachers Association and the Kenyan National Union of Teachers also sent their solidarity messages imploring teacher unions to push for better remuneration and conditions of service.
About 250 delegates among them officials from the Ministry of Education, Sport, Arts and Culture and academics attended the conference, which ended on Saturday.
The indigenisation and economic empowerment took centre stage during the conference, which ran under the theme, "Enhancing the Status of Teachers Through Economic Empowerment."

 

 

 

 

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